MDP alum Glynn receives Ireland Gov't Postgrad Scholarship

Congratulations to MDP alum Natalie Glynn on receiving the prestigious Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship
http://www.research.ie/scheme/government-ireland-postgraduate-scholarship-scheme-2016

Update from Natalie: "After graduating I worked for a year at the CDC in the National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID) as an Evaluation Fellow in the Office of the Director. While there I worked on an Ebola entry screening evaluation, a Botulism outbreak post-action review, evaluation planning for the Division of Safety Research in NIOSH and the Office of Technology and Innovation, and internal NCEZID organization improvement research and planning. My fellowship ended in September 2015, which is when I moved to Ireland.

I am currently a doctoral researcher at Trinity College Dublin in the School of Social Work & Social Policy. I was originally awarded a 3-year studentship that covered tuition/fees and provided a stipend. I recently received the Government of Ireland Postgraduate Scholarship that will be for the next three years. It also covers tuition, provides a living stipend, and entitles me to 2500 euros in research moneys each year.
(I applied to the AHSS stream, which had 515 applicants. I am not sure how many awards were given, but it is considered very competitive and prestigious in Ireland. More information on the award can be found at the following link: http://www.research.ie/scheme/government-ireland-postgraduate-scholarship-scheme-2016 )

While here I am studying young people leaving state care at the age of 18 and their transition into aftercare and young adulthood. The Irish state changed their legislation in December 2015 to create an obligation to provide care leavers with aftercare plans and services (and those who are eligible that have recently left care). The Irish context is poorly studied, has no system of tracking which makes quantitative studies impossible, and has a rights-based policy environment that makes it an interesting context to study. I will be recruiting 30-40 young people leaving care at the age of 18 for a year long longitudinal qualitative study of the transition out of care. I'm particularly interested in barriers and facilitators to a successful transition, understanding how young people conceptualize a successful transition, and identifying what relationships young people rely upon during the transition out of care. I am currently in the process of applying for ethical approval and writing up my literature review and full research proposal for the confirmation process in order to be transferred to the PhD register."
Sent by Prof. Christopher Johnstone, UMN CEHD
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