PA 5451 Immigration, Health and Public Policy


An on-line course for graduate students interested in Public Policy, Education, Public Health, Nursing, Social Work, Pharmacy and related fields. The course may be taken for 3 or 4 graduate credits (4 credits with a final project; 3 credits without final project). 
The course qualifies as an elective for the Human Rights Minor at the U, and fulfills requirements for the 7-credit Health Disparities Interdisciplinary Concentration in the School of Public Health, the Global Public Policy Concentration at the Humphrey School of Public Affairs, and other electives in both schools. 
The demography of American communities is changing dramatically, but many of our institutions have not kept pace with the needs of new African, Asian, Eastern European and Latino residents. Health care and social service providers used to treating European-origin families and some Latino residents are now working with refugees from such countries as Somalia, Ethiopia, Laos, Bosnia, Cambodia and the Sudan. In order to meet the needs of these new residents, it is imperative for providers and policy makers to understand the context and motives for immigration, as well as the characteristics and belief systems of their clients.

Professor
Katherine Fennelly
Professor emerita, Public Policy
Humphrey School of Public Affairs
fenne007@umn.edu

Audience
Policy makers and public officials; health care providers; educators, social workers, pharmacists, community agency professionals; graduate students in public policy, public health, medicine, nursing, social work, public affairs, education, and the social sciences

Course Goals
Students taking this course will gain an understanding of the characteristics of immigrants and their families in the United States, major health needs, principles of cultural competence in service provision, and tools for effective advocacy.

Community Work
The key to becoming “culturally competent” is to go into the community to meet and learn from the residents you hope to serve. Community work includes doing a demographic analysis of a community of your choosing, visiting a business that serves immigrants, and interviewing a social service or health provider who works with immigrants.

Course Objectives
• Acquire research skills to access demographic, health and background information on immigrants in the U.S.
• Understand the major characteristics and health needs of new immigrants
• Design “culturally competent” health programs
• Learn to advocate for needed changes to promote immigrant health
• Interact with other professionals and policymakers

Course Schedule
Unit 1 - Research skills to access demographic, health and background information
Unit 2 - Characteristics and health needs of new immigrants
Unit 3 - Culturally competent care
Unit 4 - Advocacy

Course Format
• Online delivery
• 14 weeks (offered in fall and spring semester)

Registration Questions? Contact Stacey Grimes
grime004@umn.edu 612-626-1329

Enrollment is limited. You may register up to two weeks before the course begins, if space is still available.

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